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European Initiatives
26 Nov 2013

A number of EU-wide initiatives are relevant to SMEs in the chemical industry. The following summary outlines three of these:

EUREM - the European EnergyManager training programme

EUREM, the training programme and network for European EnergyManager, is targeted at small- and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) from the manufacturing industries sector, to enable them increase energy efficiency and competitiveness. The programme has already reached out to 21 countries in the world and provided more than 3 000 European EnergyManagers with know-how to ensure energy efficiency in their companies.

Hardly any experts doubt that prices for energy will significantly increase, even if the global financial and economic crisis left a dent in the curve of rising oil prices. Energy costs, however, were and still are largely ignored in many companies. Rising prices have made investments in savings measures increasingly attractive.

Increasing energy efficiency is precisely the task of the EUREM programme - it promotes company-wide energy savings and hence contributes to climate protection. The training of one employee to become an energy manager helps to make the right decisions. On average, each EnergyManager develops measures with savings potentials of 750 MWh/year for his company during the course. About 80 % of these get implemented and further ones are carried out later on. Or, put another way, the energy savings potential identified by 3,000 European EnergyManagers during the EUREM training was altogether about 2.25 mln MWh in 2011 - equivalent to the energy consumption of 562,500 households.

The EUREM initiative has gradually evolved from "Energy Manager (CCI)". Practical trainings were started in Germany in 1999 by the Chamber of Commerce and Industry for Nuremberg and Central Franconia. The standardised European EnergyManager training programme comprises courses, self-learning and practical work, combined with access to the European alumni network for continued knowledge exchange. Experts and executives who are a self-responsible part of companies (e.g. operating managers, production managers, energy officers, maintenance engineers, process engineers, and factory technicians) as well as energy service providers are the typical target group for the EnergyManager Training.

Learn more about EUREM: www.energymanager.eu 

  • Contact point
  • Name
  • Dr. Robert Schmidt
  • Organisation
  • Nuremberg Chamber of Commerce and Industry
  • Position
  • EUREM Speaker and Chairman of the EUREM Steering Committee
  • Phone
  • +49 911 1335-299
  • E-mail
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

ICCA roadmaps towards greater energy efficiency

At the 19th session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP-19) in Warsaw, the International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) unveiled its brand new summary roadmap on the chemical industry’s contributions to energy efficiency and mitigating climate change.

The summary brings together findings from three ICCA-commissioned roadmaps highlighting the achievements and ambitions of the sector in catalytic processes, building technology and biofuels. The forecast for 2050 is impressive. Given favourable legislative conditions, deploying the best current catalyst technologies and related process improvements could reduce energy intensity for relevant products by 20% to 40%. Combining ambitious building enclosure improvements is expected to cut building energy use by 41% and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 70%. The bio-energy and biofuel roadmap has identified that bio-energy sources will play an important role.

"The chemical industry shows a way forward via solutions that help improve energy efficiency and the related emissions while achieving sustainable growth," said Russel Mills, Global Director, Energy & Climate Change Policy, Dow Chemical Company, and Vice Chair of the ICCA Energy and Climate Change Leadership Group. "Policymakers at COP-19 must help bring these breakthrough technologies like building insulation and catalysts into wide use, both in developing and developed markets."

ICCA has also recently published two other guidance documents. The first, How to Know If and When it's Time to Commission a Life Cycle Assessment, helps industry understand life-cycle thinking and evaluate the impacts of products throughout their entire lifespan. The second, developed in conjunction with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), Addressing the Avoided Emissions Challenge provides guidelines for chemical companies worldwide, and other interested stakeholders, on how to measure, manage and communicate avoided GHG emissions of value chains where chemical products are used.

Mills added: "The avoided emissions guidelines give an in-depth look at how the chemical industry is constantly seeking for ways to improve energy efficiency and lower GHG emissions within the overall manufacturing value chain."

  • Contact point
  • Name
  • James Pieper
  • Organisation
  • Cefic
  • Position
  • Press Officer
  • Phone
  • +32 2 676 7398
  • E-mail
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

SPIRE for the European process industries

SPIRE, the Sustainable Process Industries for Resource & Energy efficiency, is one of the first innovation-driven public-private partnerships in Europe. It aims to rejuvenate the European process industry, to make it more competitive and sustainable, leading to growth and jobs.

SPIRE aims to realise two key resource and energy efficiency targets within a time horizon of 2030:

  1. A reduction in fossil energy intensity of up to 30% from current levels by 2030 through a combination of, for example, cogeneration-heat-power, process intensification, introduction of novel energy-saving processes, energy recovery, and progressive introduction of alternative (renewable) energy sources within the process cycle,
  2. By 2030, up to 20% reduction in non-renewable, primary raw material intensity compared to current levels, by increasing chemical and physical transformation yields and/ or using secondary (through optimised recycling processes) and renewable raw materials. This may require more sophisticated and more processed raw materials from the raw materials industries.

The SPIRE initiative distinguishes itself from other initiatives targeting resource and energy efficiency in process industries by explicitly taking a cross sectoral approach. Many ongoing national and European initiatives are often either sector-oriented (e.g. national innovation contracts for the bio-economy, European Research Fund for Coal and Steel, etc.) or technology-driven (e.g. nanoscience).

SPIRE brings together cement, ceramics, chemicals, engineering, minerals and ores, non-ferrous metals, steel and water sectors, several being world-leading sectors operating from Europe. These sectors represent a major part of the manufacturing base in Europe (EU27), including more than 450,000 individual enterprises. They have over 6.8 million employees, generating more than 1,600 billion € turnover. As such they represent 20% of the total European industry, both in terms of employment and turnover.

All having a high dependence on resources (energy, raw materials and water) in their production and striving for long-term sustainability, they have a clear and urgent interest in improved efficiency and competitiveness which will actually drive the implementation of many European policies. As the European process industry represents the economic roots of the European economy, it is uniquely positioned to steer the work towards these objectives.

  • Contact point
  • Name
  • Loredana Ghinea
  • Organisation
  • Cefic
  • Position
  • Executive Director
  • Phone
  • +32 2 676 72 31
  • E-mail
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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